PhD Student Selected as 2020 Paul Ambrose Scholar

 

Daryl Traylor, a PhD student at University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing, has been selected as a cohort member of the 2020 Paul Ambrose Scholars Program. Each year, 35 health professional applicants are selected from accredited institutions to plan and implement a public health community-based project based on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators. 

Traylor, MS, MPH, CHES, whose research interest lies in HIV-prevention and education, views the Ambrose Scholar Program as a way to utilize his professional graduate skills. For his community-based project, he plans to work with African American beauty salons to pilot an HIV prevention and intervention session for women ages 18 and older. Traylor’s pilot project will educate women on HIV testing options, basic contraceptive practices, communicating with intimate partners, and peer relationships. Previous research has shown this intervention works for men in barber shop settings so Traylor hopes to see success in a beauty salon setting.

“The Ambrose Scholar program will have a direct impact on the health of my community, which is a powerful motivator for me,” Traylor said. “It also provides the chance to practice what I’ve learned as a nursing PhD student.”

Traylor credits his faculty mentors, staff and colleagues for supporting his goal and increasing his confidence. During his graduate studies, Traylor feels the SSON has increased his speaking and presentation skills, giving him a higher level of self-assurance about his research interests.

Dr. Tina Bloom had a huge influence in shaping how I think about the social determinants of health and what I learned in her class will become a part of the community project that I am implementing during my year as an Ambrose Scholar,” Traylor said. “I also had enthusiastic backing from Dr. Maithe Enriquez when I considered applying for the program.”

CTA: Learn more about the doctoral program in nursing at the Sinclair School of Nursing.

Alexander Wins National Health Informatics Award

 

Gregory Alexander, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and associate dean of research at University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing, has been awarded the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society’s and the Alliance for Nursing Informatics joint 2020 Nursing Informatics Leadership Award.

This annual award is given to professional nursing leaders who conduct groundbreaking research in the health informatics field through optimizing health engagement and outcomes in relation to access and improved technology. Alexander, whose research interests include information technology effects on the quality of care in nursing homes and long-term care facilities, will receive the national award at the annual conference in March.

“Greg is transforming the landscape of information technology in the health care setting, and this award recognizes his hard work and dedication to the field,” Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Sinclair School of Nursing said. “His research translates into better care and outcomes for the aging population, something our school is proud to be leaders in.”

Grant award presented to doctoral student, Michele Kennett

 

This cross-sectional study of the four universities in the University of Missouri system will compare perceived differences in research climate across institutions and subunits within institutions.  The survey, the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe), is a validated tool designed to assess the organizational climate for research integrity in academic institutions.  This study is funded by theDepartment of Health and Human Services Office of Research Integrity. The population to be surveyed from each university includes all graduate students, tenured/tenure-track faculty, post- doctoral fellows, and all research personnel. These data will provide valuable information about employees’ perceptions of the research climate.  By better understanding subunit similarities and differences, targeted educational interventions and organizational change initiatives can be developed within institutions to promote research integrity. 

Verna Adwell Rhodes Endowed Professorship

Friday, May 3, friends, family, former students and faculty from the Sinclair School of Nursing filled the Jesse Rotunda for the announcement and celebration of the establishment of the Verna Adwell Rhodes Endowed Professorship in Nursing. 

In honor of Rhodes’ achievements, service and generosity, her family and friends have come together to give $1 million to establish the professorship which will help attract and retain influential research faculty in the School of Nursing.

Verna Adwell Rhodes’ career as a nurse, professor and researcher has taken her around the world. Her dedication to improving the field of nursing also has helped put the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing on the map in the field of oncology nursing. Friday was a culmination of a dazzling career to celebrate Verna’s accomplishments. 

Latha Ramchand, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs at MU greeted the crowd on Friday speaking of the impact Jim and Verna Rhodes have had on the university, former students, and the Sinclair School of Nursing. 

Dean Sarah Thompson also addressed the crowd and thanked the Rhodes family for their generosity. “Verna’s impact on thousands of students over three decades has left an indelible mark on nursing researchers and professionals throughout the country,” Thompson said. “This professorship will allow the school to attract nursing research faculty who will continue to add to the Sinclair School of Nursing’s international prestige and renown.”

Mei Fu, Associate Professor with Tenure NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York University, and former student of Verna’s also spoke at the announcement. As an undergraduate student, Mei Fu received the Verna Rhodes Undergraduate Nursing Scholarship for $500. This news came just days before the start of the semester and Fu explained that that money helped her buy all her textbooks for the semester. 

“Verna epitomizes every quality of a nursing scholar as well as human kindness,” Fu said. 

Click here for the full press release from the MU News Bureau. 

Recent PhD Grad wins $40,000 Research Award

Recent PhD graduate, Elizabeth Monsees, PhD, RN, CIC, FAPIC, Antibiotic Stewardship Program Manager at Children’s Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, was awarded the 2019-2020 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) Heroes Implementation Research Scholar Award for her work in integrating nurses into antibiotic stewardship processes.

 

Elizabeth’s project, titled “Frontline Stewards: Antibiotic Engagement Tool,” leverages her previous work to test the implementation and evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-developed Antibiotic Engagement Tool (AET).

Nurses are uniquely positioned to deploy stewardship strategies across the health care continuum by optimizing the timely administration and discontinuation of antibiotics, obtaining cultures before antibiotics are administered, identifying potential changes from intravenous delivery routes to oral therapy to avoid line complications, and providing education to ensure antibiotic adherence. Results from this study will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention for scalability and sustainability.

APIC’s Heroes Implementation Research Scholar Award Program provides career development opportunities for highly qualified individuals to plan, implement, and develop a written report for a research project demonstrating value and implications for infection prevention and quality efforts across clinical settings.

Congratulations Elizabeth!