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Whoever said there aren’t enough hours in the day clearly didn’t know Julio Loya. The senior nurse manager for the Trauma Progressive Care Unit and Abdominal Transplant/Surgical Oncology Intermediate Care Unit at Banner University Medical Center Tucson Campus in Tucson, Arizona, Julio works full time at the only Level 1 Trauma Center for Southern Arizona. By day, he is responsible for the supervision of nursing staff and, ultimately, the delivery of safe, efficient patient care, which includes being available on the units to support nursing staff, helping administer medications to patients, attending meetings where decisions that affect unit workflow or environment are made and much more.

“I think the largest part of my job consists of being flexible and being present as different situations develop,” he says.

But that’s just his day job. At night and on weekends, Julio — who’s worked as a nurse for more than 13 years — switches into what he refers to as “student mode,” when he studies and completes assignments toward his PhD in nursing through the MU Sinclair School of Nursing’s online program.        

Finding his path

Although Julio’s passion for nursing is evident from his career and educational pursuits, it’s not the path he started out on. In fact, his academic journey began at the University of Arizona, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in general biology.

“After realizing that I did not want to be a biologist, I did not really know what to do next,” he says. “At the suggestion of my brother, I decided to check out nursing school. Due to my looming graduation and pending engagement to my now-wife, I decided to enroll in a program that would start right away.”

Julio went straight from the University of Arizona to Cochise College in Douglas, Arizona, where he earned an Associate of Applied Science in nursing. Soon after graduation, he began working at Banner University Medical Center.

“After being a nurse for approximately three years, I took a leadership position as an assistant manager on my unit,” he says. “Since having a bachelor’s of science in nursing (BSN) was a job requirement, I started an online RN-BSN program in 2008, and I obtained my BSN in 2010.”

It was during those undergraduate courses on professional nurse development that Julio realized he wanted to pursue a graduate degree, and after extensive research on programs across the country, he landed on the Sinclair School of Nursing (SSON). 

“I originally enrolled in the Master of Nursing in Leadership program in the Sinclair School of Nursing as a part-time student since I thought that I wanted to continue on a leadership path in the acute care setting,” he says. “Through coursework completion, I came to the realization that I really enjoy research.”

With the encouragement of program mentors, including Dr. Maithe Enriquez (current SSON faculty), throughout his classes in the MS(N) program, Julio decided in 2014 to change gears again, this time to enroll as a full-time student in the SSON’s PhD in nursing program.

“Once I started interacting with faculty and completing some of the requirements for courses, I realized that I made a great decision by enrolling at Mizzou,” he says. “The decision to apply to the PhD program was made really easy due to the support and encouragement from the faculty and also through the quality interactions I had in the virtual classroom with my fellow students.”

Distance and self-discipline

Although Julio’s daily schedule is an ambitious undertaking in and of itself, he’s quick to point out that the SSON program has been flexible enough to fit in among the rigors of a full-time job.

“One of the striking differences from my past experiences in school is that everyone at the SSON really takes the time to listen and to help you achieve your goals,” he says. “As a busy working professional, there are times where life has happened, and the faculty and staff at the SSON have been extremely supportive.”

The online aspect of the program is a benefit as well. Today, Julio lives in Marana, Arizona, just north of Tucson, with his wife of 13 years, Krista; their black Lab, Luna; and cocker spaniel, Shadow. But he says the 1,300+-mile commute between home and school isn’t a problem.  

“While the experience of being in a distance-mediated program requires self-discipline and self-motivation to meet deadlines, the faculty and staff are always willing to meet virtually if you’re not on campus,” he says. “Whether it is email, a Skype session or a telephone call, faculty and staff respond quickly to any inquiries.”

Next steps

On track to graduate with his PhD in December 2019, Julio hopes to secure a faculty position at a research-intensive university with a dual role as faculty and researcher.

“The PhD program at the SSON continues to prepare me to assume that role upon graduation,” he says. “The rigorous coursework along with the mentorship offered by both faculty and my PhD committee chair and members have made an enormous difference.”

The program has impacted his present work as well.

“As a PhD student, you are becoming one of the world’s experts on a very narrow aspect of a topic,” Julio says. “As I have advanced through the PhD program, I am now able to make connections and analyze and interpret data in ways in which I was unable to before. Pursuing my PhD through the SSON has cemented my belief that the science of nursing requires an evolving way of thinking to ensure nursing delivers on the promise of providing evidence-based care to individuals and communities.” 

Click here for more on the Sinclair School of Nursing’s Ph.D. program.

Students, Faculty and Alumni Represent SSON at MNRS Conference

The Sinclair School of Nursing (SSON) showed off its research prowess at the Midwest Nursing Research Society’s (MNRS) 42nd Annual Research Conference. The SSON team gave 16 research presentations and took home three awards from the conference, themed “The Future of Nursing Research: Economic Realities and Creative Solutions.”

The team also took on new leadership roles. PhD alumna Briana Snyder was elected as co-chair of the MNRS Emerging Scholars Network (ENS) while current PhD student Jennifer O’Connor was elected ENS treasurer.

In addition to networking and presenting research, students, faculty and alumni networked with other professionals to discuss online course content and future research collaborations and work on research proposals and dissertation write-ups. The conference was held in Cleveland, Ohio, April 12-15.

Awards
  • Deidre Wipke-Tevis, associate professor and director of the PhD program, received the Honor A Researcher Award after being nominated by five of her current and former PhD students.
  • Tammie Gainey, a 2017 PhD graduate, received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Physiology, Behavior, Genomics & Society Research Interest Group for her dissertation, “Pharmacogenetic Testing in Outpatient Mental Health Clinics.”
  • Tammy Rood, a 2017 DNP graduate, received the First Place DNP Student Poster Award for her poster, “A Quality Improvement Project to Improve Provision of Asthma Action Plans.”
Presentations
Name Presentation Title (type)
Dr. Greg Alexander, faculty

National Trends in Nursing Home Information Technology Sophistication and Relationships to Quality Measure (podium)

Jody Blankenship, PhD student Using Density Maps to Detect Variation in Depressive Symptoms among Senior Housing Residents (poster)
India Bloom, BSN student An Analysis of Emergency Department Use by Medicare Beneficiaries in South Dakota (poster)
Dr. Jo-Ana Chase, faculty Emergency Room Visits in Older Post-Acute Home Health Care Patients: Does Race/Ethnicity Matter? (podium)
Karen Clark, PhD student & RWJF FNS Identifying the Needs and Stressors Affecting the Physical and Psychological Health of Custodial Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (poster)
Tammie Conley, PhD student, RWJF FNS & Jonas Global Scholar Addressing Hypertension in Four Rural Dominican Bateyes (podium)
Dr. Laurel Despins, faculty Intensive Care Unit Nurses Use the Electronic Medical Record in Patient Deterioration Detection (poster)
Dr. Maithe Enriquez, faculty Keeping It Real: A CBPR Study (podium)
Rungnapha Khlewchaum, PhD student Systematic Review of Interventions to Improve Health and Well-Being among Caregivers with Elderly People (poster)
Poungkamon Krisanabud, PhD student

The Association between Symptom Severity and Physical Activity Interference among Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients: A Pilot Study (poster)

Beth Mettes, DNP Student & Jonas Global Scholar Intervention to Prevent Cataracts in a Vulnerable Population of Haitian Immigrants (poster)
Elizabeth Monsees, PhD student & Jonas PhD scholar Understanding Potential Barriers to Antimicrobial Stewardship by Pediatric Staff Nurses: The Link Between AHRQ Patient Safety Culture and Antimicrobial Stewardship Survey Results (podium)
Jennifer O’Connor, PhD student, T32 fellow & Jonas Global Scholar Prevalence of Foot Health Problems among Haitian Sugarcane Workers Living in the Bateyes of the Southeastern Dominican Republic
Dr. Lori Popejoy, faculty Reducing Hospitalization from MOQI Nursing Homes: APRNs Use of Root Cause Analysis to Reduce Hospitalizations (poster)
Meredith Rice, PhD student & RWJF FNS Effects of Role Modeling in Simulation on Student Anxiety (poster)
Dr. Tammy Rood, faculty A Quality Improvement Project to Improve Provision of Asthma Action Plans (poster)
Dr. Deidre Wipke-Tevis, faculty Impact of Age and Self-Reported Activity Patterns on Skin Microcirculation in Healthy Adults (poster)

 

SSON Recognized as Stellar School

The Sinclair School of Nursing (SSON) is one of two schools this year to earn the National Student Nurses’ Association’s NSNA Stellar School Chapter Recognition. The award recognizes school chapters for their ongoing involvement in NSNA and their commitment to shared governance and professional development.

The NSNA Stellar School Chapter certificate and pins were presented to faculty advisor, Donna Otto, and school chapter president, Annaliese Moore, at the NSNA 66th Annual Convention April 4-8, 2018, in Nashville.

Moore was joined by four of her fellow Student Nurses’ Association members at the annual conference. Moore, along with Liz Kimsey, May Mathews, TJ Headley and Zach Forby, make up the chapter’s executive board. With the flexibility of the professors, the team was able to attend the weeklong conferences, where they attended presentations, met nurse leaders, networked with student nurses from across the country and served as delegates, voting on resolutions and policy changes for NSNA.

“It is an amazing honor to work with such energetic, positive, eager students and to help guide them as they grow in the profession of nursing,” says Donno Otto, Instructor Emerita of Nursing and Faculty Advisor to the Student Nurses’ Association.

Student Receives Statewide Scholarship

Maddie Scheibal has been chosen as the 2017-18 Missouri League for Nursing (MLN) Scholarship winner! Maddie was selected among applicants from nursing schools across the state. We are very proud of Maddie and this recognition of her future potential in nursing. The scholarship was awarded on Student Day at the MLN’s 65th Annual Convention, April 10, at Tan-Tar-A, Osage Beach.

A Selfless Spring Break

For many college students, spring break is a chance to take a much-needed vacation. Others may head home to visit their families and catch up on sleep. Several nursing students chose to use this year’s spring break to serve others throughout the country and across the world. Here are a few of their stories.

Gracie Kelly, 7th Semester, Traditional BSN student
On her fifth Mizzou Alternative Breaks trip, Gracie was a site leader for an environmental service trip. Her team partnered with the San Juan Mountain Association to replace a rusty barbed wire fence that keeps wild horses in a safe region. They also helped with trail maintenance and trash clean up at the national parks.

“It was really out of my comfort zone,” she says, “and I did that on purpose to learn about the environment and see how it is connected to health. I learned a lot. If we are more mindful of what we are putting into the environment and what we are putting into our bodies, we could see better health outcomes.”

As a trip leader, Gracie also had to learn to handle unforeseen circumstances and plan changes.

“I had to learn how to adapt constantly,” she says. “There were many solutions and problems that came around that I had to try to solve – that is 100% nursing.”

Megan Sherman, 5th Semester, Traditional BSN, and Jonathan Aguilar, Accelerated student beginning May 2018

Jonathan and Megan were two of 60 Mizzou students who traveled to Harmons, Jamaica, with Veritas, a student ministry organization through The Crossing Church. The team built three homes for members of the community and spent time visiting patients in the infirmary, a home for those with physical and mental disabilities whose families could not care for them.

While in the infirmary, Megan and Jon sang to the residents and applied lotion to their feet.

“It showed me how the smallest of actions can have big impacts,” Megan says. “As a nursing student and one day as a nurse, I am not above any need. I have time to do what my patient needs me to do.”

Jon agrees – the infirmary experience pushed him to overcome insecurities to care for a patient in need.

“The infirmary was very outside my comfort zone,” he explains. “I was expected to show love and care despite any of my personal insecurities. It ended up being my favorite part of the trip.”

Gabby Sowa, pre-nursing student

Gabby led a weekend trip to St. Louis Children’s Hospital. As the community service chair of the Student Nurses’ Association (SNA), she contacted Mizzou Alternative Breaks about a partnership. They agreed and helped organize a trip for students who are in SNA.

“I want SNA to be involved in the greater community, not just Mizzou,” Gabby says. “I thought this would be a great experience for SNA to get more exposure. It was a great way to help people, promote ourselves and the school.”

The students visited with children staying in the hospital, leading them in arts and crafts and playing with them. They also visited Avalon Gardens, a nursing home in St. Louis, to play bingo with the residents and shadow staff nurses. Along the way, Gabby says she grew in her conviction that a career in nursing was for her.

“I came away realizing how much work it is, but how worthwhile the work is,” she says. “I really realized the effect just our interactions can have. I saw firsthand how much compassion can affect people of all ages in all settings.”