News

Getting Through the Times – Thoughts from a Registered Nurse

By Wendy Boren
Tuesday, April 7, 2020

It’s coming. The end of this awful pandemic is coming because this too shall pass. But we’ve got an ugly fight ahead of us in our area. I’m a nurse, and I’m proud to say we’re up for it. But we need your help. In one week’s time the number of cases of COVID-19 in Cape Girardeau and surrounding counties has more than tripled. I work in long-term care, and I can tell you it’s here. This is what we need from you:

* Stay home! Every time you go out unnecessarily you put the lives of health care workers (your friends, your family, your neighbors) at risk and make that fight even harder, even longer.

* Spread joy! We all need some joy right now. A simple sign saying Thank-You, a text, a virtual hug, blowing our residents kisses through the window — simple acts of kindness mean everything right now.

* Get creative! If you’re an artist, a musician, a dancer, a carpenter — whatever your talent, share it with us virtually. Record yourself and send us the link so our residents have a reason to smile. This is a lonely time for them. They’re stuck in their rooms, away from their friends, out of their normal routine. We need the smiles.

* Make masks and face shields. I can tell you now, we do not have enough. Can’t sew? Cut fabric for those that can. Can’t get to the store? Order supplies online — they’re pretty cheap. Get your kids involved! They’re out of school and bored anyway. Make good use of that time and teach them true philanthropy.

I said it’s coming and it is — it’s already here. But you know what else is coming? Spring, true blue skies and bright flowers. And I believe, truly, that this pandemic is giving us a chance to rethink our world. What’s coming after all this hell? Children who will grow up to be amazing and compassionate leaders, new reforms on conversation, a new respect for those considered essential to keep life moving, and a new appreciation for our families and our communities.

I’m a nurse. I haven’t slept much lately. I’ve cried buckets of tears that you’ll never see. I’ve kept that smile and dug deep for the courage. We’re in for an ugly fight. Please help us however you can.

God Bless and stay safe.

Wendy Boren is a registered nurse who resides in Tamms, Illinois.

Update from Dean Sarah Thompson

To the Sinclair School of Nursing family,

Today we face a changing world with the impact of COVID-19. As each day brings new realities, anxiety and fear are normal. We all share concerns regarding ourselves, family and friends. Nurses are once again called to the frontline. I am humbled by the commitment of our profession.

Here at Sinclair School of Nursing we remain committed to:

  • The health and well-being of our faculty, staff, and students
  • Excellence in education for all our students
  • Service to our community

I appreciate everything you have done to this point and I know we will continue to work together to meet tomorrow’s challenges. 

Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dean and Professor
Sinclair School of Nursing
University of Missouri
S215 School of Nursing
Columbia MO 65211
573 882 0278

 

Awards Banquet And Alumni Reunion Cancellation

It is with great disappointment that due to the spread of COVID-19, we are canceling the 2020 Sinclair School of Nursing Awards Banquet and Alumni Reunion. We want to be responsible and are following the advice that is coming from our public health officials. 

Although, we are disappointed, health and safety are our top priorities.

If you have already RSVP’d, Sherry Cass will contact you.  For other information or questions, please contact Sherry Cass at 573.882.2416 or email casss@missouri.edu.

 

PhD Student Selected as 2020 Paul Ambrose Scholar

 

Daryl Traylor, a PhD student at University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing, has been selected as a cohort member of the 2020 Paul Ambrose Scholars Program. Each year, 35 health professional applicants are selected from accredited institutions to plan and implement a public health community-based project based on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators. 

Traylor, MS, MPH, CHES, whose research interest lies in HIV-prevention and education, views the Ambrose Scholar Program as a way to utilize his professional graduate skills. For his community-based project, he plans to work with African American beauty salons to pilot an HIV prevention and intervention session for women ages 18 and older. Traylor’s pilot project will educate women on HIV testing options, basic contraceptive practices, communicating with intimate partners, and peer relationships. Previous research has shown this intervention works for men in barber shop settings so Traylor hopes to see success in a beauty salon setting.

“The Ambrose Scholar program will have a direct impact on the health of my community, which is a powerful motivator for me,” Traylor said. “It also provides the chance to practice what I’ve learned as a nursing PhD student.”

Traylor credits his faculty mentors, staff and colleagues for supporting his goal and increasing his confidence. During his graduate studies, Traylor feels the SSON has increased his speaking and presentation skills, giving him a higher level of self-assurance about his research interests.

Dr. Tina Bloom had a huge influence in shaping how I think about the social determinants of health and what I learned in her class will become a part of the community project that I am implementing during my year as an Ambrose Scholar,” Traylor said. “I also had enthusiastic backing from Dr. Maithe Enriquez when I considered applying for the program.”

CTA: Learn more about the doctoral program in nursing at the Sinclair School of Nursing.

Alexander Wins National Health Informatics Award

 

Gregory Alexander, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and associate dean of research at University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing, has been awarded the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society’s and the Alliance for Nursing Informatics joint 2020 Nursing Informatics Leadership Award.

This annual award is given to professional nursing leaders who conduct groundbreaking research in the health informatics field through optimizing health engagement and outcomes in relation to access and improved technology. Alexander, whose research interests include information technology effects on the quality of care in nursing homes and long-term care facilities, will receive the national award at the annual conference in March.

“Greg is transforming the landscape of information technology in the health care setting, and this award recognizes his hard work and dedication to the field,” Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Sinclair School of Nursing said. “His research translates into better care and outcomes for the aging population, something our school is proud to be leaders in.”