Got milk? Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies

Researchers compare traditional cows milk based fortifiers with human milk based alternative.

More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. “Preemies” can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow’s milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.

Now, a new research study from the University of Missouri and University College in London suggests that using a human-based milk fortifier has better health outcomes for severely underweight, premature babies compared to traditional, cow-based milk fortifiers.

Headshot of Jan Sherman
Jan Sherman is a professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing.

Jan Sherman, a professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, collaborated with Alan Lucas, a professor at University College in London, to perform a meta-analysis on various studies involving more than 450 severely underweight, premature babies in the United States, Canada and Austria who received either traditional cow-based milk fortifiers or human-based milk fortifiers.

By comparing their health outcomes, they found that the babies who were fed cow milk fortifiers were more than three times as likely to develop necrotizing enterocolitis, a life-threatening intestine disease, and more than twice as likely to develop retinopathy of prematurity, an eye disorder that can lead to blindness.

“Everyone wants what’s best for these underweight, premature babies, and choosing the best type of milk fortifiers for feeding can help lead to improved health outcomes,” said Sherman. “Nearly half of neonatal intensive care units in the United States, including the one at MU Children’s Hospital, are already using human-based milk fortifiers. If we can reduce these cases of necrotizing enterocolitis, if we can preserve their eye sight and reduce the risk of infection, that will benefit the babies’ health in the long term.”

Headshot of Alan Lucas
Alan Lucas is a professor at University College in London.
 

Neonatal intensive care units can use this research in evaluating the nutritional supplements they give to severely underweight, premature babies, who have a higher risk of death or disease than babies born after a full nine-month pregnancy.

“Our research is geared toward better understanding if we can avoid cow’s milk fortifiers while still feeding premature infants well,” said Lucas. “The most current evidence suggests that a diet with entirely human milk and enriched feeds manufactured from donated human milk will meet the nutritional needs of the baby without the potential negative health effects that can come with a cow milk fortifier.”

“Safety of Cow’s Milk-Derived Fortifiers Used with an All-Human Milk Base Diet in Very Low Birthweight Preterm Infants” was recently published in Neonatology Today. Other authors include Maushumi Assad of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, John Boscardin of UC San Francisco and Steven Abrams of University of Texas, Austin.

See original story here.

New Grads! – 2020 Accelerated Class FLIP BOOK

Every semester we are proud to graduate another professionally-driven class of nurses from the Sinclair School of Nursing. This summer’s accelerated class faced many challenges, not only persevering through those challenges but also being adaptable in a time of uncertainty. They will leave our doors with everything they need to succeed and our doors remain open, – our faculty, staff and alumni are all here to support and cheer them on in this next chapter. Here are a few of our graduates and their chosen quotes of inspiration. Please join us in celebrating the talented 2020 graduates of the Sinclair School of Nursing.

Graduate Flip Book

Oncology Nursing Foundation Celebrates the Importance of Mentorship in Nursing

Connie Henke Yarbro, RN, MS, FAAN, is Adjunct Courtesy Faculty, Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and Founding Editor of Seminars in Oncology Nursing.  She is one of four founders of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) in 1975, and founded the Oncology Nursing Foundation to support nurses both nationally and internationally.
 
Yarbro had the opportunity to get involved in the  US and Internationally to addressed the numerous challenges of our profession over the years. “It was rewarding to work with nurses and help them aspire to becoming involved in oncology nursing.  In 1975 cancer nursing research was just really beginning, as was education in nursing schools. I started Seminars in Oncology Nursing 35 years ago and was able to mentor oncology nurses to be editors and authors. Today, oncology nurses are having a major impact with the research on patient care, survivorship etc.  These nurses, like Mei Fu, are mentoring the next generation of oncology nurses.
 

The Oncology Nursing Foundation announces the recipient of the 2020 Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award is Mei R. Fu (Qiu), PhD, RN, FAAN. Dr. Fu is a Barry Family/Goldman Sachs Endowed Professor in the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College in Massachusetts. She will join an upcoming conversation on the importance of mentorship in cancer nursing on June 15, 2020, at 4 pm EST via a webinar.

The Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award was established to recognize and support excellence in oncology nursing mentorship in the name of a founding member of the Oncology Nursing Society and Foundation, Connie Henke Yarbro. “Mei has gone above and beyond in many ways as a nurse scientist to inspire others in her field. She has committed to nurturing professional development in students both nationally and internationally,” said Oncology Nursing Foundation president, Tracy Gosselin, PhD, RN, AOCN®, NEA-BC, FAAN. “Her assistance with educational pursuits, research, grant funding, and multicultural engagement is extraordinary.”

“From my mentors, I learned the most important quality of a wonderful mentor is the mentors’ trust in our ability when we had very little confidence in and limited vision for our nursing career, but they foresaw our potentials and encouraged us to go forward and beyond. It is their trust in our ability and personalized guidance that made us successful in our career.” Said Dr. Fu.

An Oncology Nursing Society member for more than 25 years, Dr. Fu is an internationally and nationally recognized nurse scientist, researcher, and educator, with a scientific focus on cancer-related symptoms and the management of chronic illnesses. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a senior fellow of geriatrics of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, and a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. Her research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Oncology Nursing Foundation, and the Avon Foundation, among others. Dr. Fu’s research has been recognized with an Oncology Nursing Society Excellence in Cancer Nursing Research Award and an International Lymphology Association Young Investigator Award.

“I am extremely humbled and honored to be selected as the recipient of the 2020 Oncology Nursing Foundation Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award. I am blessed to have many talented oncology nurses and nurse scientists working with me along this wonderful journey,” said Dr. Fu. “I cherish this wonderful recognition from the Oncology Nursing Foundation and will continue to dedicate my time to mentor nurses for years to come.”

VIRTUAL COMMENCEMENT CELEBRATION!!

CONGRATULATIONS! Sinclair School of Nursing has some really fun things in store for you on our Commencement Celebration page. You’ll be able to:

  1. Link to commencement.missouri.edu to see what campus is doing.
  2. Students, Faculty and Staff can record and leave well-wishes on our Flipgrip program.
  3. You can sign the commencement guest book!
  4. Download fun fillable pages to post or make your own memory sheet.
  5. Download fun stickers and Facebook banners to support your nursing grad.
  6. See our featured Outstanding Graduate, Hannah Fortner
  7. Find your name on our virtual program. 
  8. Follow what we are posting and sharing on our social media sites.

  CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE PAGE!

foam finger imageWe hope you have a wonderful day of celebration. Our graduates have worked so hard and deserve so much. All of us at SSON are proud of you and cheering you on until we can meet in person again.

 

 

Update from Dean Sarah Thompson

To the Sinclair School of Nursing family,

Today we face a changing world with the impact of COVID-19. As each day brings new realities, anxiety and fear are normal. We all share concerns regarding ourselves, family and friends. Nurses are once again called to the frontline. I am humbled by the commitment of our profession.

Here at Sinclair School of Nursing we remain committed to:

  • The health and well-being of our faculty, staff, and students
  • Excellence in education for all our students
  • Service to our community

I appreciate everything you have done to this point and I know we will continue to work together to meet tomorrow’s challenges. 

Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dean and Professor
Sinclair School of Nursing
University of Missouri
S215 School of Nursing
Columbia MO 65211
573 882 0278