Only Missouri School to Achieve Status as a National Student Nurses Association Stellar School

Missouri Nursing Student Association (MONSA) held its annual convention in St. Louis on Thursday and Friday, October 25 & 26.

The Sinclair School of Nursing had seven enthusiastic Student Nurse Association members attend the conference, along with Faculty Advisor, Donna Otto.

The students, from left to right are: Liz Kimsey, Emma Scroggins, Marielle Allen, Hannah Jolly, Paige Wallis, Grace Optican and Taylar Dayton.

During the convention, Junior, Liz Kimsey was elected MONSA President and Emma Scroggins Northern District Director.

They will proudly represent the Sinclair School of Nursing as they serve their 2018-19 term in office.

The MONSA Convention October 16 & 17 2019 will be held in Columbia. This will be an excellent opportunity for Sinclair to really showcase who we are!

“Our students work very hard to reach the goals established at the local level,” Otto said. “It is wonderful to see them recognized at the state and national level for their efforts.”

Laura Remy – Opinion Piece in Columbia Tribune

 

Current PhD student, Laura Remy published her thoughts on the EPA rollbacks with the Columbia Daily Tribune newspaper. 

As a nurse, I know that having access to clean air to breathe and clean water to drink is essential for human health. That is why it is so alarming that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back vital clean air and water safeguards, putting the health of millions of Americans at risk. Since the formation of the EPA, and due to regulatory efforts to clean up our air, land and water, great progress has been made. However, rollbacks threaten to halt this progress.

Over the past five decades, EPA programs have helped reduce lead pollution by over 90 percent. This means fewer children with permanent neurological harm and a greater chance to succeed in school and life. Similarly, regulations under the Clean Air Act are estimated to realize $2 trillion in benefits by 2020.

However, there is still work to be done. Children and families in Flint, Michigan, and Kansas City are still getting sick from toxic lead pollution.

Read the full article published by the Columbia Tribune on Friday, Oct 26, here

Alexander named Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics

October 9, 2018 – Interim Associate Dean for Research, Greg Alexander, will be inducted into the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) on Nov. 4 at a ceremony during the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2018 Annual Symposium in San Francisco.

Alexander is one of 18 Fellows who will be inducted this year.

 “The election of ACMI Fellows represents the strength and diversity of informatics with recognition of 18 accomplished individuals who are national and international subject matter experts in the science of informatics as it relates to clinical care, research, education and policy,” said ACMI President Christopher G. Chute. “It reflects the growing impact of the field in health care.”

“To be elected as a Fellow to the American College of Medical Informatics is a great honor,” Alexander said. “This designation given by my peers recognizes my ‘significant and sustained contributions to the field of biomedical informatics.’ To have my work recognized by my peers in this way is the greatest reward I could have been given.”

  “I am thrilled that Dr. Alexander has received a significant honor, in recognition of his many accomplishments,” Dean Sarah Thompson, said. “Dr. Alexander is one of our many exemplary faculty here at the Sinclair School of Nursing. This award is a tribute to our collective strength.”

“Many ACMI fellows are pioneers in this field whose work in research, policy, education, etc. have made a lasting impression in healthcare and medicine,” Alexander said.
For a complete list of ACMI fellows go to: https://www.amia.org/acmi-fellowship

ACMI is an honorary College of elected Informatics Fellows from the United States and abroad who have made significant and sustained contributions to the field of medical informatics and who have met rigorous scholarly scrutiny by their peers.

AMIA, the leading professional association for informatics professionals, comprises 5,500 informatics professionals from more than 65 countries. AMIA and its members play a leading role in assessing the effect of health innovations on health policy and advancing the field of informatics.

Accelerated Student Welcome Breakfast

Sunshine filled the Weldon Webb classroom as 67 accelerated nursing students filed in with backpacks on and coffees in hand.

The Nursing Alumni Organization at the University of Missouri hosted the annual Accelerated Student Welcome Continental Breakfast on Friday, June 15.

Students mingled with School of Nursing faculty and leaders from Boone Hospital and MU Health Care. After breakfast, several leaders in nursing took turns speaking to the students and encouraging them in their studies.

Mary Beck, joint courtesy faculty and chief nursing officer, MU Health Care, was among those in nursing leadership in attendance.

 “One of the things I think is important about nursing is life-long learning,” Beck said. “Always take advantage of opportunities to continue your education and participate in continuing education events.”

 
Mary Beck, joint courtesy faculty and chief nursing officer, MU Health Care, center, enjoys breakfast with current accelerated nursing school students.

Associate dean for Academic Affairs, Robin Harris, also addressed the group and reminded the students that they can reach their goals.

“Know that we wouldn’t have said yes to your name if we didn’t think that you could do this,” Harris said.

Robin Harris, associate dean for academic affairs, reminded the students to “embrace every moment of this really fast paced program”.

 

The Accelerated BSN is an intense 15-month, on-campus option for students who hold a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited college or university in a field other than nursing. Courses during the 15 months focus on developing nursing knowledge and skills needed to enter nursing practice upon graduation as a BSN prepared nurse.

Current accelerated class for 2018-2019. Sixty seven students have begun course work in the rigorous 15-month program.

 

Susan Devaney, Nursing Alumni Organization president, handed each student a black leather padfolio as a welcoming gift. The students then gathered for a group photo before heading back to class.

Go to our Facebook page to see more photos from the morning.

Sinclair School of Nursing Receives $3 Million Gift from University of Missouri Health Care

COLUMBIA, Mo. ― The Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri has received a $3 million gift from University of Missouri Health Care to help fund the renovation and expansion of the current School of Nursing building.

The renovation will transform the building, built in 1979, into a modern, state-of-the-art facility, with updated simulation labs and practice facilities, as well as an expanded research area. There also will be more classroom space, accommodations for distance learning, and lounge areas for students.

“We’re committed to the success of our partners at the MU Sinclair School of Nursing,” said Jonathan Curtright, chief executive officer for MU Health Care. “We’re honored to provide $3 million to help train more nurses for Missourians. We want our patients to receive the best care possible, and that means having top-notch nurses. We’re proud to partner with the school in this mission and are excited to see this project come to fruition.”

This investment in the Sinclair School of Nursing will support program expansion and enable a 30 to 40 percent increase in nursing graduates. In the current building, space constraints have contributed to the Sinclair School of Nursing having to turn away students. 

“We are so appreciative of the support and great relationship with MU Health Care,” said Interim Dean Roxanne McDaniel. “This investment in the school will allow us to admit more students and educate more nurses to work at MU Health Care and across the state of Missouri.”

The investment is an example of the confidence health system leaders have in the high quality of the MU nursing faculty who educate, mentor and inspire the next generation of nurses. The Sinclair School of Nursing ranks as the No. 1 nursing school program by College Atlas Encyclopedia of Higher Education.

The United States Department of Labor anticipates a 15 percent growth in registered nurses across the United States in the next eight years.

Being able to admit more students and graduate more nurses from the Sinclair School of Nursing will have an advantageous effect on the aging population in Missouri and across the U.S.,” McDaniel said.

The project is slated for completion in 2021.

For more information about the Sinclair School of Nursing academic programs, research teams and renovation updates, go to www.nursing.missouri.edu

 

Sinclair School of Nursing, S218 School of Nursing, Columbia, MO 65211

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