Mizzou Alumni Association Names 2020 Faculty Alumni Award Winners

 
MIZZOU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION NAMES 2020 FACULTY ALUMNI AWARD WINNERS

We are so pleased to announce that three out of the twelve award winners are MU Sinclair School of Nursing alumni! 

Original article by MU Aliumni Association posted November 20, 2020

The Mizzou Alumni Association is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2020 Faculty-Alumni Awards. 

“We are honored to recognize Mizzou’s best and brightest, both in and out of the classroom,” said Todd McCubbin, MAA Executive Director. “It is the combined efforts of our world-class faculty and accomplished alumni that make this University such an incredible place, both for our scholars and our community at large.”

First celebrated in 1968, these awards recognize the achievements of Mizzou’s faculty and alumni. Faculty are considered for their work as teachers, administrators and researchers, while alumni are considered for their professional accomplishments and service to Mizzou.

“We look forward to celebrating these incredible Tigers and their accomplishments,” said Robin Wenneker, MAA President. “It’s a wonderful reminder of the talent we find ourselves surrounded by every day on this campus and the impressive Tigers in our alumni community. Mizzou is truly fortunate.”

November 20, 2020 would have been the date of their official induction at the Faculty-Alumni Awards ceremony. Instead, recipients will be recognized for their stellar contributions at a later date. Today, Mizzou is proud to share the list of recipients. 

“Each of these individuals has contributed to the success of our university and community through their excellence in teaching, research, leadership and service,” said Dr. Mun Choi, UM System President and MU Chancellor.

“With their support and guidance, Mizzou continues to strengthen its role as a national, public, AAU institution of the highest caliber. On behalf of Tigers everywhere, I want to thank our outstanding awardees for their hard work and commitment.”

Visit Mizzou.com/FAA for more details on each of these award winners.

The recipients of the 2020 Faculty-Alumni Awards are as follows:

65th Annual Distinguished Service Award

61st Annual Distinguished Faculty Award

  • R. Wilson Freyermuth
    • John D. Lawson Professor of Law; Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor, School of Law

2020 Faculty-Alumni Award Recipients

Virtual Campaign Celebration

Over the last five years Sinclair School of Nursing has been part of a campaign to raise money for various efforts such as the construction of their new state of-the-art facility, student scholarship support, research endeavors, and more. The goal was $10 million dollars and during this time, due to the amazing support of donors, a total of $17,636,904 was raised. 


From this, 14 new active endowments and 2 planned endowments for student scholarships were formed. In total, 2,129 donors gave to support this campaign and 807 of them were SSON Alumni. 

If you would like to view the recorded presentation, please click here

We are humbled and proud of all the student support to thank and show appreciation to our donors.  As you will see in this presentation,the students always add a special component to any event that we host.  You can’t help but grin ear-to-ear while listening to them.  They make the School of Nursing so proud!

Got milk? Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies

Researchers compare traditional cows milk based fortifiers with human milk based alternative.

More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. “Preemies” can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow’s milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.

Now, a new research study from the University of Missouri and University College in London suggests that using a human-based milk fortifier has better health outcomes for severely underweight, premature babies compared to traditional, cow-based milk fortifiers.

Headshot of Jan Sherman
Jan Sherman is a professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing.

Jan Sherman, a professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing, collaborated with Alan Lucas, a professor at University College in London, to perform a meta-analysis on various studies involving more than 450 severely underweight, premature babies in the United States, Canada and Austria who received either traditional cow-based milk fortifiers or human-based milk fortifiers.

By comparing their health outcomes, they found that the babies who were fed cow milk fortifiers were more than three times as likely to develop necrotizing enterocolitis, a life-threatening intestine disease, and more than twice as likely to develop retinopathy of prematurity, an eye disorder that can lead to blindness.

“Everyone wants what’s best for these underweight, premature babies, and choosing the best type of milk fortifiers for feeding can help lead to improved health outcomes,” said Sherman. “Nearly half of neonatal intensive care units in the United States, including the one at MU Children’s Hospital, are already using human-based milk fortifiers. If we can reduce these cases of necrotizing enterocolitis, if we can preserve their eye sight and reduce the risk of infection, that will benefit the babies’ health in the long term.”

Headshot of Alan Lucas
Alan Lucas is a professor at University College in London.
 

Neonatal intensive care units can use this research in evaluating the nutritional supplements they give to severely underweight, premature babies, who have a higher risk of death or disease than babies born after a full nine-month pregnancy.

“Our research is geared toward better understanding if we can avoid cow’s milk fortifiers while still feeding premature infants well,” said Lucas. “The most current evidence suggests that a diet with entirely human milk and enriched feeds manufactured from donated human milk will meet the nutritional needs of the baby without the potential negative health effects that can come with a cow milk fortifier.”

“Safety of Cow’s Milk-Derived Fortifiers Used with an All-Human Milk Base Diet in Very Low Birthweight Preterm Infants” was recently published in Neonatology Today. Other authors include Maushumi Assad of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, John Boscardin of UC San Francisco and Steven Abrams of University of Texas, Austin.

See original story here.

2020 Living Legend Marilyn Rantz, PhD, RN, FAAN

It takes vision and determination to be a leader. In today’s society, leaders are all around us, but only every once in a while does one rise to the top as a Living Legend.

Every year the American Academy of  Nursing honors a small number of fellows as Living Legends. These individuals have made significant contributions to the nursing profession and made a positive impact on health care. Traditionally, their “legendary contributions” continue far beyond their own career and have a lasting impact on health care or health policy.  

Sinclair School of Nursing is honored to share that the American Academy of Nursing released this week that they have chosen our very own Marilyn Rantz PhD, RN, FAAN as one of 2020’s Living Legend. 

“Her research efforts have improved care processes, reduced costs associated with care, and improved the quality and length of life of older adults. These research-based strategies and interventions will have an impact on care delivery and the lives of older adults for years to come”, said Dean Sarah Thompson.

Marilyn Rantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the premier expert in quality measurement in nursing homes and research programs to improve elder care. A nurse for 50 years, Dr. Rantz’s pioneering work and innovative spirit is evidenced through the profession’s paradigm shifts in measuring nursing home quality, utilizing new technologies to help seniors live independently, and gaining fair reimbursement for nursing services. 

Dr. Rantz also initiated legislation to set the stage for nurses practicing to the full scope of their education and training and has received more than $87 million in various grants to further her work. She is Executive Director for the Aging in Place Project, which allows seniors to “age in place” through the creation of Sinclair Home Care and the Quality Improvement Program for Missouri which has transformed the care Missouri nursing home residents receive— both models being designated as Academy Edge Runners. Dr. Rantz is Curators’ Professor Emerita, University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing.

Dr. Rantz will be inducted as a Living Legend at the Academy virtual ceremony in October. 

 

To find out more about the nomination process visit: https://www.aannet.org/about/fellows/living-legends

Click Here to read the Columbia Missourian story posted 9/1/2020

Oncology Nursing Foundation Celebrates the Importance of Mentorship in Nursing

Connie Henke Yarbro, RN, MS, FAAN, is Adjunct Courtesy Faculty, Sinclair School of Nursing at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and Founding Editor of Seminars in Oncology Nursing.  She is one of four founders of the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) in 1975, and founded the Oncology Nursing Foundation to support nurses both nationally and internationally.
 
Yarbro had the opportunity to get involved in the  US and Internationally to addressed the numerous challenges of our profession over the years. “It was rewarding to work with nurses and help them aspire to becoming involved in oncology nursing.  In 1975 cancer nursing research was just really beginning, as was education in nursing schools. I started Seminars in Oncology Nursing 35 years ago and was able to mentor oncology nurses to be editors and authors. Today, oncology nurses are having a major impact with the research on patient care, survivorship etc.  These nurses, like Mei Fu, are mentoring the next generation of oncology nurses.
 

The Oncology Nursing Foundation announces the recipient of the 2020 Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award is Mei R. Fu (Qiu), PhD, RN, FAAN. Dr. Fu is a Barry Family/Goldman Sachs Endowed Professor in the William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College in Massachusetts. She will join an upcoming conversation on the importance of mentorship in cancer nursing on June 15, 2020, at 4 pm EST via a webinar.

The Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award was established to recognize and support excellence in oncology nursing mentorship in the name of a founding member of the Oncology Nursing Society and Foundation, Connie Henke Yarbro. “Mei has gone above and beyond in many ways as a nurse scientist to inspire others in her field. She has committed to nurturing professional development in students both nationally and internationally,” said Oncology Nursing Foundation president, Tracy Gosselin, PhD, RN, AOCN®, NEA-BC, FAAN. “Her assistance with educational pursuits, research, grant funding, and multicultural engagement is extraordinary.”

“From my mentors, I learned the most important quality of a wonderful mentor is the mentors’ trust in our ability when we had very little confidence in and limited vision for our nursing career, but they foresaw our potentials and encouraged us to go forward and beyond. It is their trust in our ability and personalized guidance that made us successful in our career.” Said Dr. Fu.

An Oncology Nursing Society member for more than 25 years, Dr. Fu is an internationally and nationally recognized nurse scientist, researcher, and educator, with a scientific focus on cancer-related symptoms and the management of chronic illnesses. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a senior fellow of geriatrics of the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing, and a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine. Her research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Oncology Nursing Foundation, and the Avon Foundation, among others. Dr. Fu’s research has been recognized with an Oncology Nursing Society Excellence in Cancer Nursing Research Award and an International Lymphology Association Young Investigator Award.

“I am extremely humbled and honored to be selected as the recipient of the 2020 Oncology Nursing Foundation Connie Henke Yarbro Excellence in Cancer Nursing Mentorship Award. I am blessed to have many talented oncology nurses and nurse scientists working with me along this wonderful journey,” said Dr. Fu. “I cherish this wonderful recognition from the Oncology Nursing Foundation and will continue to dedicate my time to mentor nurses for years to come.”