DNP Graduate Wins Ribbon at MNRS for Poster Presentation

April 19, 2016University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing DNP graduate Shelby Thomas, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, CLNC, found herself with a ribbon at the 40th Annual Research Conference of the Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS). The conference was held in Milwaukee,…


Shelby-Thomas

Shelby Thomas received a second place ribbon for her DNP project.

April 19, 2016

University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing DNP graduate Shelby Thomas, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, CLNC, found herself with a ribbon at the 40th Annual Research Conference of the Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS). The conference was held in Milwaukee, WI, during the week of March 17-20.

Each year, nursing schools around the Midwest take part in the conference. Each school can select up to three students to represent their school’s BSN, MSN, DNP, and PhD programs in the MNRS Student Poster Exchange and Competition. The Student Poster Exchange and Competition is a highly attended and much respected part of the conference.

There were three categories for posters at this year’s conference:

  1. Research
  2. Evidence-based Projects
  3. Evidence-based Literature Review

In the DNP category, Thomas claimed second place for her DNP project entitled Intimate Partner Violence (IPV): Enhancing Vigilance of Screening, Treatment, and Referral in the Primary Care Setting.


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