SSON Ranked Best Program in the Nation

April 28, 2014

COLUMBIA, Mo – The University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing (SSON) was rated as the best nursing school program in the country by CollegeAtlas.org. The school is dedicated to making its students the best educated and most qualified nursing students by the time they graduate.

SSON has always been helping aspiring students and education minded professionals make better, more informed choices by providing them with relevant, reliable and up-to-date information about college and higher education opportunities.

SSON is dedicated to discovering new knowledge and implementing best practices in teaching, research and service. Our students get the opportunity to learn from some of the greatest and most-innovative researchers in the world. They not only learn how to care for patients, but they do so with the latest technology. By the time our students graduate, they are a cut above the rest.

The school is committed to preparing nurses at the baccalaureate, masters and doctoral levels to meet care needs of the citizens of Missouri and the world. Our degree opportunities include: a bachelor’s degree, an online RN to BSN option, an accelerated BSN program, a master’s program, a doctor of nursing practice (DNP), and a PhD degree. Our students can be assured they will be nurses before they graduate.

Collegeatlas.org is an online publication that ranks colleges based on four things: affordability, academic quality, accessibility, and NCLEX-RN board exam pass rates. You can click here to see the entire list.

Rose Porter Dedicates Trees and a bench to the SSON

Aug. 26, 2014

The first kindness trees on the University of Missouri campus are now located just outside of the Sinclair School of Nursing. They were dedicated by nursing dean emerita, Rose Porter, PhD, RN. Rose served as the dean of the school from 1999 to 2008.

Her and her husband, Mike, say the university and city of Columbia have given them such great lives, they needed some way to say thank you. Their solution were to dedicated trees and benches around campus.

“We want this space to become a symbol of compassion and kindness, a campus of understanding of creating a community of caring and love for one another,” Porter said.

The mindset behind the trees and benches comes from a long history of dealing with students. It all started with former chancellor Brady Deaton’s wife, Anne, and her vision of planting a grove of trees to honor children harmed because of mental illness. After the tragedy in Sandy Hook, Anne and fellow nursing alumna, Suzanne McDavid, kicked the project into high gear. That grove of trees is now planted at Stephens Lake Park in Columbia.

However, Rose wanted to expand the grove to the university. The theme of all of her trees is a powerful motto she is a firm believer of, “A single act of kindness can change a life forever.”

“That’s a very powerful statement, and how apt it is that it’s being planted at the school of nursing because who know better than a nurse of how important it is to reach out with kindness,” McDavid said.

Rose says the motto came from a story about a middle school student that was going to commit suicide. He ultimately decided against it when someone showed an act of kindness towards him.

“That was very touching. Then after spending two years as interim dean at the college of education did I ever become aware of the mental health needs in our schools. That’s where it really, really hit me,” Porter said.

Rose and her husband are dedicating a total of 6 trees and two benches. She says the areas where they reside, are not their space, but they’re a special place of healing, rest and kindness for everyone.

Seniors Who Exercise Regularly Experience Less Physical Decline as They Age, MU Study Finds

June 3, 2014

COLUMBIA, Mo. –The majority of adults aged 65 and older remains inactive and fails to meet recommended physical activity guidelines, previous research has shown. However, these studies have not represented elders living in retirement communities who may have more access to recreational activities and exercise equipment. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri found that older adults in retirement communities who reported more exercise experienced less physical decline than their peers who reported less exercise, although many adults — even those who exercised — did not complete muscle-strengthening exercises, which are another defense against physical decline.

“Physical decline is natural in this age group, but we found that people who exercised more declined less,” said Lorraine Phillips, an associate professor in the MU Sinclair School of Nursing. “The most popular physical activities the residents of the retirement community reported doing were light housework and walking, both of which are easily integrated into individuals’ daily lives, but these exercises are not the best choices for maintaining muscle strength.”

Phillips and her colleagues studied the physical activity of 38 residents at TigerPlace, an independent-living community in Columbia, four times in one year. The researchers tested the residents’ walking speed, balance and their ability to stand up after sitting in a chair. Then, researchers compared the results of the tests to the residents’ self-reported participation in exercise. Phillips found that residents who reported doing more exercise had more success maintaining their physical abilities over time.

Phillips says the national recommendations for exercise include muscle strengthening exercises, such as knee extensions and bicep curls. Most of the study participants did not report completing these types of activities despite daily opportunities for recreational activities and access to exercise equipment. Phillips says muscle strength is important to individuals of this age group in order for them to maintain their ability to conduct everyday activities such as opening jars, standing up from chairs and supporting their own bodyweight.

“For older individuals, walking may represent the most familiar and comfortable type of physical activity,” Phillips said. “Muscle-strengthening exercises should be promoted more aggressively in retirement communities and made more appealing to residents.”

To combat the lack of physical activity among seniors, Phillips says health care providers should discuss exercise programs with their patients and share the possible risks associated with their lack of exercise, such as losing their ability to live independently. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals 65 years of age and older that have no limiting health conditions should do muscle-strengthening activities that work all major muscle groups at least two days a week.

Phillips’ research, “Retirement Community Residents’ Physical Activity, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Limitations,” was published in Clinical Nursing Research.

Article By: Diamond Dixon, MU News Bureau