Sinclair School of Nursing – In the News

During the past several weeks, students, faculty, and the nursing program as a whole gained the interest of local media outlets. 

First, Yang Li, a postdoctoral fellow spoke to KOMU about the model she has developed to help psychiatrists better understand their female post-traumatic stress disorder patients.

Li began her research about women and PTSD while she was a doctoral student at the University of Michigan.

Li said her research focused on two stress-related hormones, cortisol and oxytocin. These two hormones would work together when stress occurs. 

“We hypothesized that if those two stress-related hormones work well and interact well, women would be more resilient to stress,” said Li. “Otherwise, they would be more likely to have PTSD.”

See the full article on KOMU

Next, BSN Program Director, Sherri Ulbrich, was interviewed by KRCG on Monday, May 6, to address how the Sinclair School of Nursing is working to educate more nurses and combat the national nursing shortage. 

“We’re really combating it from two different standpoints: increasing our student enrollment as well as increasing the number of nurse educators,” Ulbrich said.

As for increasing student enrollment, Ulbrich said the school has to turn away students because the program has outgrown its building. The University of Missouri Board of Curators recently approved a $30 million plan to replace the building.

See the full video here 

DNP On Campus Days

More than 30 DNP students from all areas of study came to Columbia March 9- 13. Students spent the first two and a half days on campus practicing physical assessment skills and clinical skills such as biopsy, nerve block, foreign body removal, motivational interviewing, and assessment of confusion and substance use. Experts spoke to students on diabetes management, care of the eye, and Second Victim.

For the second half of the week, students attended the Advanced Practice Assessment and Skills Workshop providing an opportunity to network with Nurse Practitioners from around the state including some of our alumni. Participants had an opportunity to learn Basic and Advanced Suturing skills, biopsy, incision and drainage, and nerve block. Expert speakers presented on a variety of topics related to pediatric, mental health, aging, and emerging topics on medical marijuana, LGBTQ and self-care.

         

 

Midwest Nursing Research Society Conference

The Midwest Nursing Research Society (MNRS) held its 43rd Annual Research Conference in Kansas City, Missouri on March 27-30, 2019. The theme for the 2019 conference was “Nursing Research at the Forefront of Healthcare Crises”.

A premier nursing research society, the mission of MNRS is to advance science, transform practice and enhance careers through a network of scholars. As one of the co-host schools for the conference, the Sinclair School of Nursing played a big part in making the conference a success. SSON graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, alumni, and faculty gave more than 30 research presentations at the conference and three will received awards! Specifically, Dr. Yuanlu Sun received the Dissertation Award from the Self-Care Research Interest Group (RIG); Dr. Donna Prentice received the Graduate Student Award from the Acute & Critical Care Across the Lifespan RIG, and Dr. Kimberly Powell received the Dissertation Award from the Health Systems, Policy and Informatics RIG. 

Moreover, our faculty, alumni and students were actively involved in the organization of the event. For example, Drs. Maithe Enriquez and Deidre Wipke-Tevis were on the MNRS Local Planning Committee. Professor Emeritus Vicki Conn PhD, RN is the editor of the society’s journal—Western Journal of Nursing Research. PhD alumna, Dr. Briana Snyder, is co-chairing the Emerging Scholars Network (ESN), a collaborative network of students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career nursing professionals that connects scholars at different levels of study and provides expanded opportunities for engagement and leadership within MNRS. Additionally, PhD candidate, Jennifer O’Connor, is currently the treasurer of the ESN. 

The Alpha Iota chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society, affiliated with SSON, was one of the sponsors for Emerging Scholars Network Lunch & Learn which focused on “Career Planning for Doctorally-Prepared Nurses”. Additionally, to celebrate our research successes and introduce our new Dean, Dr. Sarah Thompson, the SSON hosted a reception for our students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and alumni who attended the conference. 

Effectively Treating Hypertension in Underserved Communities

Associate Professor, Maithe Enriquez has partnered with the Dominican Light a Candle Foundation, Kansas City non-profit Dominican Republic Medical Partnership and American non-profit Jonas Philanthropies to pilot a hypertension care program in underserved communities of Haitian immigrants in the Dominican Republic. So far, the results of this program indicate that it is both effective and sustainable.

 Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a major health concern worldwide, affecting an estimated 31 percent of the world’s population. Low and middle-income countries, such as the Dominican Republic, are disproportionately affected.

“Communities of migrant workers in the Dominican Republic have limited access to health care and healthy food, and so they end up eating lots of sugar and salt, which increases their risk of cardiac issues,” Enriquez said. “We coordinated with local communities to bring these people free screenings and treatment.”

This program, known as the Jonas Batey Hypertension Program, brought care to four bateyes, which are rural sugarcane settlements that often lack running water, electricity, proper sanitation and convenient access to health clinics or medication. The local foundation visited each community four times per year, providing screenings, multivitamins and a three-month supply of blood pressure medication to those in need at each visit. Though the program is still ongoing, it was evaluated by Enriquez and her colleagues after a one-year period.

The evaluation showed that among 813 participants who had participated in the program continuously for at least one year, 243 were diagnosed with hypertension and treated.

Click here to read the full News Release from the MU News Bureau.  

Marilyn Rantz to Receive March of Dimes Legend in Nursing Award

St. Louis, MO — March of Dimes is pleased to announce the 2018 Legend Award Recipient, Marilyn Rantz, Curators Professor Emerita of Nursing, at the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing.

Rantz was recognized Saturday, Nov 10 at the annual Nurse of the Year Awards gala, presented by Maryville University, held annually to honor exceptional nurses.

Since 1992, Rantz has been pioneering work in nursing home care quality. Her career spans 35 years, first in practice, then as a leading researcher at MU. She is an internationally recognized expert in quality measurement in nursing homes and research programs to improve the quality of care of older people.

“It is wonderful to have my work recognized by March of Dimes,” Rantz said. “I’m really passionate about finding innovative ways to improve health care. That’s what gets me up in the morning.”

Rantz and her interdisciplinary research teams have received more than $80 million in funding to conduct research in long-term care, new delivery models of care for older adults, and most recently, for technology development to help older adults stay in their homes as they age. Much of this research is conducted at TigerPlace, a model of independent housing to enable older people to age in place through the end of life, maximizing independence and function.

The March of Dimes Nurse of the Year Awards gala was held at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel with a reception and dinner beginning at 6:00 p.m. The event was expected to draw more than 650 attendees while raising critical funds for March of Dimes.

Leading the event were co-chairs, Elizabeth Buck of Maryville University and Joan Smith of St. Louis Children’s Hospital, along with an Executive Leadership Team.

“We are proud and honored to be this year’s co-chairs of the Nurse of the Year Awards. March of Dimes does so much for our community through their advocacy, education and research programs.” Buck said.

A selection committee comprised of health care professionals reviewed the confidential nomination forms and announced the award finalists in 20 nursing specialty categories.

Funds raised by the Nurse of the Year Awards gala help support prenatal wellness programs, research grants, and neonatal intensive care unit family support and provide education and advocacy so that every baby can have the best possible start. Today, 1 in 10 babies is born too soon in the United States each year. March of Dimes is committed to working together to improve the health of every mom and baby.

 About March of Dimes

March of Dimes leads the fight for the health of all moms and babies. We support research, lead programs and provide education and advocacy so that every baby can have the best possible start. Building on a successful 80-year legacy of impact and innovation, we empower every mom and every family. Visit marchofdimes.org or nacersano.org for more information. Visit shareyourstory.org for comfort and support. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram and Twitter.