VIRTUAL COMMENCEMENT CELEBRATION!!

CONGRATULATIONS! Sinclair School of Nursing has some really fun things in store for you on our Commencement Celebration page. You’ll be able to:

  1. Link to commencement.missouri.edu to see what campus is doing.
  2. Students, Faculty and Staff can record and leave well-wishes on our Flipgrip program.
  3. You can sign the commencement guest book!
  4. Download fun fillable pages to post or make your own memory sheet.
  5. Download fun stickers and Facebook banners to support your nursing grad.
  6. See our featured Outstanding Graduate, Hannah Fortner
  7. Find your name on our virtual program. 
  8. Follow what we are posting and sharing on our social media sites.

  CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE PAGE!

foam finger imageWe hope you have a wonderful day of celebration. Our graduates have worked so hard and deserve so much. All of us at SSON are proud of you and cheering you on until we can meet in person again.

 

 

Happy Birthday Florence Nightingale

Affectionately known as “the lady with the lamp,” Nightingale remains a role model for nurses in the 21st century. Her care of soldiers during the Crimean War is legendary, and her thoughts on nursing, ethics and various other topics still resonate today in her published works and letters.

Timeline of important moments in Nightingale’s life:

  • May 12, 1820 —– Nightingale experiences a “Christian calling” to become a nurse while living at Embley Park in Wellow, England.
 
  • Feb. 7, 1837—– Nightingale begins to visit hospitals.
 
  • 1844 —– Nightingale becomes the leading advocate for improved medical care in the infirmaries through the reform of the so-called Poor Laws.
 
  • December 1844 —– Nightingale declares her intention to become a nurse. She visits St. Vincent de Paul Sisters of Charity convent, where she learns nursing theory.
 
  • 1845 —– Nightingale makes her first visit to Protestant Deaconess at Kaiserwerth, which cared for the poor and later became a training school for nurses and teachers.
 
  • 1850 —– Nightingale spends three months training as a sick nurse at Kaiserwerth.
 
  • 1851 —– Nightingale accepts a job as post of superintendent at the Institute for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen in Upper Harley Street, London.
 
  • Aug. 22, 1853 —– Nightingale arrives in Turkey with 38 nurses and is stationed at Selimiye Barracks in Scutari (Istanbul).
 
  • 1854 —– Nightingale nurses British soldiers through outbreaks of cholera and typhus fever.
 
  • 1855 —– A public meeting to give recognition to Nightingale for her work during the war leads to the establishment of the Nightingale Fund for the training of nurses.
 
  • Nov. 29, 1855 —– After every patient had returned to Britain, Nightingale follows. She meets with Queen Victoria at Balmoral and tells her about the defects in military hospitals and needed nursing reforms. Nightingale plays a central role in the establishment of the Royal Commission on the Health of the Army.
 
  • Aug. 7, 1856 —– After collapsing, Nightingale is sent to Malvern, a healthcare resort, where she is put on bed rest for exhaustion.
 
  • August 1857 —– In her report “Notes on Matters Affecting the Health of the British Army,” Nightingale creates statistical charts to show the number of men who died from the conditions in the hospitals compared with those who died from their wounds.
 
  • 1858 —– Nightingale is elected the first female member of the Royal Statistical Society and becomes an honorary member of the American Statistical Association. Nightingale’s 136-page introduction to nursing titled “Notes on Nursing” is published.
 
  • 1860 —– Nightingale’s attention turns to the mortality and sickness rates of British troops and citizens in India. She gathers statistics and recommends sanitation procedures.
 
  • 1860 —– The Nightingale Fund is used to set up the Nightingale Training School at St. Thomas’ Hospital.
 
  • July 9, 1860 —– The first trained Nightingale nurses begin work at the Liverpool Workhouse Infirmary.
 
  • May 16, 1865 —– Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell and Nightingale open the Women’s Medical College.
 
  • 1869 —– Queen Victoria honors Nightingale with the Royal Red Cross.
 
  • 1883 —– With the help of the County Council Technical Instruction Committee, Nightingale organizes a health crusade in Buckinghamshire.
 
  • 1892 —- Nightingale is bedridden again, but continues to work on hospital plans.
 
  • 1896 —– Nightingale becomes the first woman to receive the Order of Merit from King Edward VII.
 
  • 1907 —- Nightingale passes away at age 90 in London. She is buried in the graveyard at St. Margaret Church in East Wellow, Hampshire, England.

Sources: Florence Nightingale Museum, Encyclopedia Britannica

Information found at Nurse.com

Florence Nightingale was a trailblazer and champion for the nursing profession. Her efforts established some of the first modern schools of nursing, and even now, her name is synonymous with compassion and philanthropy.

Our Nightingale Society members share that dedication and reverence for the education of nurses. Today, on what would have been Florence Nightingale’s 200th birthday, we thank them for their support and ongoing commitment to the future of the Sinclair School of Nursing.If you would like to become a Nightingale member, please consider here.

Getting Through the Times – Thoughts from a Registered Nurse

By Wendy Boren
Tuesday, April 7, 2020

It’s coming. The end of this awful pandemic is coming because this too shall pass. But we’ve got an ugly fight ahead of us in our area. I’m a nurse, and I’m proud to say we’re up for it. But we need your help. In one week’s time the number of cases of COVID-19 in Cape Girardeau and surrounding counties has more than tripled. I work in long-term care, and I can tell you it’s here. This is what we need from you:

* Stay home! Every time you go out unnecessarily you put the lives of health care workers (your friends, your family, your neighbors) at risk and make that fight even harder, even longer.

* Spread joy! We all need some joy right now. A simple sign saying Thank-You, a text, a virtual hug, blowing our residents kisses through the window — simple acts of kindness mean everything right now.

* Get creative! If you’re an artist, a musician, a dancer, a carpenter — whatever your talent, share it with us virtually. Record yourself and send us the link so our residents have a reason to smile. This is a lonely time for them. They’re stuck in their rooms, away from their friends, out of their normal routine. We need the smiles.

* Make masks and face shields. I can tell you now, we do not have enough. Can’t sew? Cut fabric for those that can. Can’t get to the store? Order supplies online — they’re pretty cheap. Get your kids involved! They’re out of school and bored anyway. Make good use of that time and teach them true philanthropy.

I said it’s coming and it is — it’s already here. But you know what else is coming? Spring, true blue skies and bright flowers. And I believe, truly, that this pandemic is giving us a chance to rethink our world. What’s coming after all this hell? Children who will grow up to be amazing and compassionate leaders, new reforms on conversation, a new respect for those considered essential to keep life moving, and a new appreciation for our families and our communities.

I’m a nurse. I haven’t slept much lately. I’ve cried buckets of tears that you’ll never see. I’ve kept that smile and dug deep for the courage. We’re in for an ugly fight. Please help us however you can.

God Bless and stay safe.

Wendy Boren is a registered nurse who resides in Tamms, Illinois.

Update from Dean Sarah Thompson

To the Sinclair School of Nursing family,

Today we face a changing world with the impact of COVID-19. As each day brings new realities, anxiety and fear are normal. We all share concerns regarding ourselves, family and friends. Nurses are once again called to the frontline. I am humbled by the commitment of our profession.

Here at Sinclair School of Nursing we remain committed to:

  • The health and well-being of our faculty, staff, and students
  • Excellence in education for all our students
  • Service to our community

I appreciate everything you have done to this point and I know we will continue to work together to meet tomorrow’s challenges. 

Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN
Dean and Professor
Sinclair School of Nursing
University of Missouri
S215 School of Nursing
Columbia MO 65211
573 882 0278

 

Alexander Wins National Health Informatics Award

 

Gregory Alexander, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and associate dean of research at University of Missouri’s Sinclair School of Nursing, has been awarded the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society’s and the Alliance for Nursing Informatics joint 2020 Nursing Informatics Leadership Award.

This annual award is given to professional nursing leaders who conduct groundbreaking research in the health informatics field through optimizing health engagement and outcomes in relation to access and improved technology. Alexander, whose research interests include information technology effects on the quality of care in nursing homes and long-term care facilities, will receive the national award at the annual conference in March.

“Greg is transforming the landscape of information technology in the health care setting, and this award recognizes his hard work and dedication to the field,” Sarah Thompson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of Sinclair School of Nursing said. “His research translates into better care and outcomes for the aging population, something our school is proud to be leaders in.”