News

Students and Staff Honored at Tap Day

Six members of the Sinclair School of Nursing family were inducted into the University of Missouri secret honorary societies. At the 90th annual Tap Day ceremony in Jesse Auditorium Friday, April 14, 2017, students and staff were inducted into honor societies including Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) and Rollins Society.

Three undergraduate students were inducted into societies.

Mary Grace Kelly, a fifth semester BSN student, was inducted into Mortar Board. Mortar Board is a national honor society that recognized college seniors for their achievements in scholarship, leadership and service. Gabrielle Vest, a sixth semester BSN students, and Alyssa Goldberg, an eighth semester BSN students were both inducted into ODK. Members of ODK are juniors and seniors, graduate students, and faculty and staff who demonstrate leadership achievements in one of five phases of campus life: scholarship; athletics; campus or community service; social and religious activities; and campus government; journalism, speech and mass media; or creative and performing arts.

Tipperat “Rose” Udmuangpia, a second year PhD student, was inducted into Rollins Society. The Rollins Society was established by the Graduate Professional Council in 1994 and recognizes graduate and professional students who have significantly advanced the well-being of self-defined communities beyond the scope of their academic work.

Faculty and staff were also included among the honorees. Tina Bloom, PhD, MPH, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, was inducted into Rollins Society. Laura Anderson, senior academic advisor, was inducted as an honorary member of Mortar Board.

These students and staff members are exemplar examples of the excellence
pursued at the Sinclair School of Nursing, and we are so proud of them! 

SSON Grads, Students and Faculty Honored at MNRS Annual Conference

The University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing had a large presence at the 41st Annual Midwest Nursing Research Society Research Conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The conference, held April 6-9, was themed, “Harnessing Big Data and Nursing Science to Improve Health,” and Sinclair School of Nursing graduates, students and faculty collectively received eight awards, one research grant and had 17 presentations.

The award winners:

  • Jo-Ana Chase, PhD, RN, Sinclair School of Nursing assistant professor and 2014 PhD graduate, received the 2017 Midwestern Nursing Research Society 2017 Gerontological Nursing Science Research Interest Group New Investigator Award.
  • Deidre Wipke-Tevis, PhD, RN, Sinclair School of Nursing and PhD Program Director, was recognized for her abstract, “Impact of Leg Elevation and Compression Bandaging on Skin Microcirculation in Healthy Adults,” which was selected as a Distinguished Abstract for the 2017 Midwest Nursing Research Society Annual Conference.
  • Tammy Gainey, MSN, APRN, FNP-BC, Sinclair School of Nursing PhD candidate, received the Joseph and Jean Buckwalter Research Grant from the Midwest Nursing Research Society for her dissertation research proposal, “Pharmacogenetics Testing in Mental Health Clinics.” Tammie is mentored by Tina Bloom, PhD, MPH, RN.
  • Rebekah Flynn, Sinclair School of Nursing 2016 Adult-Gerontology CNS DNP graduate, received the 2017 Outstanding DNP Clinical Inquiry Project Award from the Midwest Nursing Research Society Acute and Critical Care Across the Lifespan Research Interest Group for her quality improvement project, “Impact of a Supervised Ambulation Protocol on Fall Rates in an Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit.” Dr. Flynn was mentored by Dr. Deidre D. Wipke-Tevis, PhD, RN.
  • Melissa Wilson, Sinclair School of Nursing 2016 PhD graduate received the 2017 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Midwest Nursing Research Society Acute and Critical Care Across the Lifespan Research Interest Group for her research, “Moral Distress: Values and Barriers Experienced by Critical Care Nurses.” Dr. Wilson was mentored by Dr. Greg Alexander, PhD, RN, FAAN.
  • Jennifer Dine, Sinclair School of Nursing 2015 PhD graduate, received the 2017 Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Midwest Nursing Research Society Physiology, Behavior, Genomics and Society Research Interest Group for her research, “Characterization of a Novel Regulator and Predictors of Sensitivity to Trail Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells.” Dr. Dine was mentored by Jane Armer, PhD, RN, FAAN at the Sinclair School of Nursing, and Stanley Lipkowitz, MD, PhD at the National Cancer Institute.
  • Marilyn Shepherd, Sinclair School of Nursing 2016 PhD graduate, received the 2017 Dissertation Award from the Midwest Nursing Research Society Health Systems, Policy and Informatics Research Interest Group for her research, “Information Technology Use in Prediction of Rapid Response Episodes, Pressure Ulcer Status and 30-Day Readmission.” Dr. Shepherd was mentored by Drs. Deidre Wipke-Tevis and Greg Alexander.
  • Pamela Ostby, Sinclair School of Nursing 2016 PhD graduate, received the 2017 Dissertation Award from the Midwest nursing Research Society Pain and Symptom Management Research Interest Group on her research, “The Effectiveness of an Interactive Theatre Intervention on Improving Patient Adherence to Self-Management Regimens for Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.”
  • Leann McLaughlin, Sinclair School of Nursing FNP DNP student, received the second place ribbon at the DNP Student Poster Contest from the Midwest Nursing Research Society for her poster, “Improving Intimate Partner Violence Detection in the Primary Care Setting: Review of the Literature.” Leann is mentored by Drs. Shelby Thomas and Tina Bloom.

In addition to these winners, the Sinclair School of Nursing also had fifteen presenters. See the table below.

Name Presentation Title
Jennifer Dine Physiology, Behavior, Genomics and Society Outstanding Dissertation RIG award presentation
Rebekah Flynn Impact of a Supervised Ambulation Protocol on Fall Rates in an Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit
Paul Jeffrey Guideline to Improve a Practical Nursing Program’s Admission Test
Leann McLaughlin Improving Intimate Partner Violence Detection in the Primary Care Setting: Review of the Literature
Jennifer O’Connor Leisure Time Physical Inactivity, Obesity and Diabetes in the Southern United States
Sabrina Orique The Effectiveness of Simulation on Recognizing and Managing Clinical Deterioration; A Meta-Analyses — Evaluating Situation Awareness: An Integrative Review
Pam Ostby
  • Pain and Symptom Management Outstanding Dissertation RIG award presentation
  • A Survey of Women with Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema (BCRL): Identifying Effective Support Options
Lori Popejoy Breaking the Cycle of Transitions from Nursing Homes to Hospitals Using Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs)
Marilyn Shepherd Health Systems, Policy and Informatics Dissertation Outstanding Dissertation RIG award presentation
Briana Snyder Views of Women with Dissociative Identity Disorder on Intimate Partner Violence
April Sun
  • The Impact of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema on Survivors’ Return to Work
  • Return-to-Work Among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Literature Review
  • The Effects of Lymphedema on Self-Reported Physical Function among Breast Cancer Survivors: a Meta-analysis
Melissa Wilson Acute and Critical Care Across the Lifespan – Outstanding Dissertation RIG award presentation
Deidre Wipke-Tevis Impact of Leg Elevation and Compression Bandaging on Skin Microcirculation in Healthy Adults

Student Presents Poster at Pediatric Conference

Amanda Gingrich, senior nursing student, presented her poster, “Brightening the Future of Pediatric Patients with Veno-Occlusive Disease through Prevention” at the Society for Pediatric Nurses 27th Annual Conference at the Palm Beach Convention Center in Florida April 6-9, 2017. Amanda collaborated with Children’s Mercy Hospital nurses Elizabeth Hawkinson, RN, an MU grad and Amanda’s externship preceptor, and Bonnie Tecza, MSN, RN, CPN, the externship director.

This poster is an evidenced-based practice project completed during her summer nurse externship on the Oncology/Hematology/Bone marrow transplant unit. Her project focused on the medication Defibrotide in the treatment of Veno-Occlusive Disease (VOD), a complication of bone marrow transplants that leads to multi-organ failure and death. Amanda found promising efficacy in Defibrotide being administered prophylactically to prevent the transplant rejection complication of VOD. These findings have been shared with Children’s Mercy staff and Bone Marrow Taskforce Team as well as presented at the 27th Society of Pediatric Nurses conference.

DNP Students Practice Skills during On-Campus Days

While most of the Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum is online, occasionally, the students from all over the country make their way to the University of Missouri campus for on-campus days.

Level 2 students were on campus March 13-17, 2017 to practice and perform a variety of skills. While here, DNP students participated in a variety of activities in the Essig Clinical Simulation Learning Center and participated in some advanced learning classes at the Peachtree Conference Center in Columbia.

In the Simulation Center, the students participated in a variety of simulations, including intimate partner violence, chest pain, sports physicals and emergency room psychiatric assessments. Students also participated in various skill trainings, including central line insertions, lumbar punctures, IUD insertion, endometrial biopsies, splinting and microscopy.

For more information on the DNP program, visit our DNP pages.

Students Meet With State Legislators

One hundred sixty-eight senior BSN students from the traditional and accelerated options and ten faculty members attended the MONA Nurse Advocacy Day Tuesday, March 7 at the Capital in Jefferson City.  Students and faculty worked across the curriculum to develop advocacy skills and identify evidence to support or oppose upcoming legislation. 

The BSN faculty curriculum committee made the commitment as a faculty to prepare and support nursing students in a nurse advocacy event during their time at the SSON. The students prepared for Nurse Advocacy Day for weeks prior to the event by identifying evidence to support or oppose the upcoming health care bills.

Some of the bills addressed specifically were the Emergency 911 Bill, a texting and driving bill, the MO Health Net Structure bill and the Narcotics Control Act. Advocacy Days was an opportunity for the students to share their evidence and participate in the process of the “big voice.” The students were asked to identify their senator or state representative. In preparation, they were asked to identify an upcoming bill and oppose or support it, identify two main benefits, provide evidence to support their position, discuss the population and request an action.

While visiting the capital, 35 students were waiting for Sen. Caleb Rowden to finish his appointment with newly-appointed University of Missouri System President Mu Choi. Both President Choi and Sen. Rowden met with students for 20-30 minutes.