Nursing School Connected Army Veteran to His Job in the Emergency Room

 

After serving his country with the Army, Adam Brandes is back home serving his community as a nurse in the ER 

 

On June 1, 2013, Adam Brandes’ Army unit had just left a graduation ceremony for new Afghanistan police officers it had trained and was headed back to its base in Ghazni Province.

“It was a nice summer day when, out of nowhere, there was a loud explosion and a cloud of dirt,” Brandes said.

Staff Sgt. Job Reigoux was in the lead vehicle with other soldiers and their interpreter when it was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade. 

“It went through the side of the truck, through Job’s right leg and left hand,” Brandes said. “When we got to the outpost … we couldn’t tell if he was alive or dead.”

Reigoux was sent to a bigger base with a field hospital. Less than an hour later, Brandes and his unit learned their buddy died on the operating table.  

“I wondered what more I could have done,” Brandes said. 

Brandes, a native of Prairie Home, Missouri, enlisted in the Army in February 2009. Ten months later, he deployed to Iraq with the Third Infantry Division. He returned to the U.S. in December 2010, and in the summer of 2011 was promoted to rank of sergeant.

“I was due to get out in 2012, but we had a call to go to Afghanistan,” Brandes said. “I extended for a year to go to Afghanistan with my squad.”

It was during this second tour that Brandes’ friend, Reigoux, was killed – just six weeks before they were scheduled to come home. 

“There were lots of emotions during the remaining time there,” Brandes said. “I served my country, and now I was ready to go home and serve my community.”

Brandes considered the options available through the GI Bill, and with encouragement from his friends, applied and was accepted into MU’s Sinclair School of Nursing. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 2017. After graduation, he had multiple job offers in mid-Missouri emergency rooms.

“I chose University Hospital for its Level 1 trauma center,” he said. “I knew I would be getting the most experience here.”

 In the Army, he supervised soldiers and had to make decisions quickly. In the ER, life-and-death decisions also have to be made fast. 

“Being overseas, stuff changes rapidly,” Brandes said. “It was something I enjoyed about it. You never know what the next day will bring.” 

Brandes isn’t left wondering any more if there is something he can do to help during medical emergencies. The skills he acquired on the front lines with the Army and in the simulation lab during nursing school allow him to help any patient who comes through the doors of the emergency room. 

Only Missouri School to Achieve Status as a National Student Nurses Association Stellar School

Missouri Nursing Student Association (MONSA) held its annual convention in St. Louis on Thursday and Friday, October 25 & 26.

The Sinclair School of Nursing had seven enthusiastic Student Nurse Association members attend the conference, along with Faculty Advisor, Donna Otto.

The students, from left to right are: Liz Kimsey, Emma Scroggins, Marielle Allen, Hannah Jolly, Paige Wallis, Grace Optican and Taylar Dayton.

During the convention, Junior, Liz Kimsey was elected MONSA President and Emma Scroggins Northern District Director.

They will proudly represent the Sinclair School of Nursing as they serve their 2018-19 term in office.

The MONSA Convention October 16 & 17 2019 will be held in Columbia. This will be an excellent opportunity for Sinclair to really showcase who we are!

“Our students work very hard to reach the goals established at the local level,” Otto said. “It is wonderful to see them recognized at the state and national level for their efforts.”

Laura Remy – Opinion Piece in Columbia Tribune

 

Current PhD student, Laura Remy published her thoughts on the EPA rollbacks with the Columbia Daily Tribune newspaper. 

As a nurse, I know that having access to clean air to breathe and clean water to drink is essential for human health. That is why it is so alarming that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back vital clean air and water safeguards, putting the health of millions of Americans at risk. Since the formation of the EPA, and due to regulatory efforts to clean up our air, land and water, great progress has been made. However, rollbacks threaten to halt this progress.

Over the past five decades, EPA programs have helped reduce lead pollution by over 90 percent. This means fewer children with permanent neurological harm and a greater chance to succeed in school and life. Similarly, regulations under the Clean Air Act are estimated to realize $2 trillion in benefits by 2020.

However, there is still work to be done. Children and families in Flint, Michigan, and Kansas City are still getting sick from toxic lead pollution.

Read the full article published by the Columbia Tribune on Friday, Oct 26, here

Alexander named Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics

October 9, 2018 – Interim Associate Dean for Research, Greg Alexander, will be inducted into the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) on Nov. 4 at a ceremony during the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2018 Annual Symposium in San Francisco.

Alexander is one of 18 Fellows who will be inducted this year.

 “The election of ACMI Fellows represents the strength and diversity of informatics with recognition of 18 accomplished individuals who are national and international subject matter experts in the science of informatics as it relates to clinical care, research, education and policy,” said ACMI President Christopher G. Chute. “It reflects the growing impact of the field in health care.”

“To be elected as a Fellow to the American College of Medical Informatics is a great honor,” Alexander said. “This designation given by my peers recognizes my ‘significant and sustained contributions to the field of biomedical informatics.’ To have my work recognized by my peers in this way is the greatest reward I could have been given.”

  “I am thrilled that Dr. Alexander has received a significant honor, in recognition of his many accomplishments,” Dean Sarah Thompson, said. “Dr. Alexander is one of our many exemplary faculty here at the Sinclair School of Nursing. This award is a tribute to our collective strength.”

“Many ACMI fellows are pioneers in this field whose work in research, policy, education, etc. have made a lasting impression in healthcare and medicine,” Alexander said.
For a complete list of ACMI fellows go to: https://www.amia.org/acmi-fellowship

ACMI is an honorary College of elected Informatics Fellows from the United States and abroad who have made significant and sustained contributions to the field of medical informatics and who have met rigorous scholarly scrutiny by their peers.

AMIA, the leading professional association for informatics professionals, comprises 5,500 informatics professionals from more than 65 countries. AMIA and its members play a leading role in assessing the effect of health innovations on health policy and advancing the field of informatics.

Accelerated Student Welcome Breakfast

Sunshine filled the Weldon Webb classroom as 67 accelerated nursing students filed in with backpacks on and coffees in hand.

The Nursing Alumni Organization at the University of Missouri hosted the annual Accelerated Student Welcome Continental Breakfast on Friday, June 15.

Students mingled with School of Nursing faculty and leaders from Boone Hospital and MU Health Care. After breakfast, several leaders in nursing took turns speaking to the students and encouraging them in their studies.

Mary Beck, joint courtesy faculty and chief nursing officer, MU Health Care, was among those in nursing leadership in attendance.

 “One of the things I think is important about nursing is life-long learning,” Beck said. “Always take advantage of opportunities to continue your education and participate in continuing education events.”

 
Mary Beck, joint courtesy faculty and chief nursing officer, MU Health Care, center, enjoys breakfast with current accelerated nursing school students.

Associate dean for Academic Affairs, Robin Harris, also addressed the group and reminded the students that they can reach their goals.

“Know that we wouldn’t have said yes to your name if we didn’t think that you could do this,” Harris said.

Robin Harris, associate dean for academic affairs, reminded the students to “embrace every moment of this really fast paced program”.

 

The Accelerated BSN is an intense 15-month, on-campus option for students who hold a bachelor’s degree or higher from an accredited college or university in a field other than nursing. Courses during the 15 months focus on developing nursing knowledge and skills needed to enter nursing practice upon graduation as a BSN prepared nurse.

Current accelerated class for 2018-2019. Sixty seven students have begun course work in the rigorous 15-month program.

 

Susan Devaney, Nursing Alumni Organization president, handed each student a black leather padfolio as a welcoming gift. The students then gathered for a group photo before heading back to class.

Go to our Facebook page to see more photos from the morning.